Youth Endowment Fund

On this page:

  1. What is the Youth Endowment Fund?
  2. Where did it come from?
  3. Who is running the Youth Endowment Fund?
  4. Why have you three been chosen to run the Youth Endowment Fund?
  5. What is a What Works Centre?
  6. What's been happening since the Youth Endowment Fund was announced?
  7. How will the governance of the Youth Endowment Fund work?
  8. How will the Youth Endowment Fund involve young people and communities affected by youth crime?
  9. How will the Youth Endowment Fund allocate funding?
  10. What will the Youth Endowment Fund do in its first year?
  11. What do you mean when you say ‘fund and evaluate?’
  12. What is the Youth Endowment Fund Evaluation Panel?
  13. How can I apply for the Youth Endowment Fund Evaluation Panel?
  14. What is the minimum threshold of eligibility for funding?
  15. How will organisations ‘move along the evidence spectrum?’
  16. Will the Youth Endowment Fund be running any briefing events for potential applicants?
  17. What if I just need funding to develop or run my existing programme and/or I do not want it to be evaluated?
  18. What support will grantees receive from the Youth Endowment Fund?
  19. How can I apply for the Youth Endowment Fund?
  20. Update on our first grant round
  21. What about the place-based work?
  22. Vacancies
  23. Contact details



1. What is the Youth Endowment Fund?

The Youth Endowment Fund is a bold new attempt to put early intervention at the heart of efforts to tackle youth offending.

It will support interventions and community partnerships working with children at risk of being drawn into crime and violence, and build up our knowledge of what works to prevent that.

Focusing on 10-14 year olds across England and Wales, it is run by youth charity Impetus, in partnership with the Early Intervention Foundation (EIF) and Social Investment Business (SIB).

2. Where did it come from?

As part of the Government’s Serious Violence Strategy, the Home Office made £200m available over the next 10 years to fund and test interventions aiming to prevent young people from being drawn in to crime and violence, to build up our knowledge of what works in this area.

3. Who is running the Youth Endowment Fund?

In March 2019 the Home Office announced the Youth Endowment Fund will be run by Impetus, in partnership with the Early Intervention Foundation and Social Investment Business, following a competitive tender.

4. Why have you three been chosen to run the Youth Endowment Fund?

Our partnership combines Impetus’ expertise of backing high impact youth charities and programmes, Early Intervention Foundation’s knowledge of how to intervene early to improve outcomes for children, and Social Investment Business’ experience of managing and evaluating large scale grant programmes, to create a bold new model to tackle youth offending.

The Early Intervention Foundation is the lead What Works Centre responsible for early intervention to improve outcomes for children and Impetus and the Sutton Trust set up the Education Endowment Foundation which seeks to improve educational attainment. The Youth Endowment Fund will join these What Works Centres in the Cabinet Office’s What Works Network.

5. What is a What Works Centre?

What Works Centres help to ensure that high quality, independently assessed evidence shapes decision-making by:

  • collating evidence on policy and practice
  • producing high quality synthesis reports and systematic reviews
  • assessing how effective policies and practices are against an agreed set of outcomes
  • sharing findings in an accessible way
  • encouraging practitioners, commissioners and policymakers to use these findings to inform their decisions

Read more about how the Youth Endowment Fund will adopt a ‘What Works’ approach.

6. What's been happening since the Youth Endowment Fund was announced?

We have been setting up the legal and governance structure for the Youth Endowment Fund, recruiting the staff to run it, commencing a rapid review of available evidence on youth offending and setting up our first grant round.

We’ve also been meeting external stakeholders and other funders in this space to explore partnerships – we are keen to draw on the experience of others in the sector and to combine efforts where we can identify common aims.

7. How will the governance of the Youth Endowment Fund work?

The Youth Endowment Fund will be constituted as an independent charitable trust, accountable to the Impetus Board.

It will have its own management committee with an independent chair. An advisory council, bringing together youth, community and sector expertise, will advise the management committee. Applications for funding will be considered by a grants committee, informed by an expert panel, before they go to the management committee for final approval.

An Executive Director and senior team will be recruited to lead the Youth Endowment Fund’s work; some of this recruitment is underway already and the Chair and Director posts will be advertised in the coming weeks.

8. How will the Youth Endowment Fund involve young people and communities affected by youth crime?

We are developing our strategy for youth and community involvement and we are committed to ensuring that the lived experience of those effected by crime and violence is reflected in our work in a meaningful way. Our advisory council will ensure that young people and communities have a voice in our governance and will also be a vital channel for the fund to communicate its work externally. Our place-based work will work in communities of high need and will involve local community organisations and young people themselves, as part of a multi-stakeholder approach.

9. How will the Youth Endowment Fund allocate funding?

Once our committees are in place they will develop our long-term strategy, outlining how we’ll dispense the fund over the next ten years.

In the meantime, the Home Office has set some clear expectations for how year one of the fund will work and so most of our focus in our first few months has been on ensuring we can deliver this year one plan.

10. What will the Youth Endowment Fund do in its first year?

This year, the Youth Endowment Fund will dispense funds in three ways. It will:

  • Run a one-off, open call round, to fund and evaluate promising approaches to preventing youth offending which have not yet gathered strong evidence of their impact. In this round, grantees will need to spend £100,000 or more by March 2020.
  • Fund a smaller number of programmes with good evidence of impact and which are ready for large scale evaluation.
  • Support two local partnerships in areas with high levels of youth crime to develop a multi-stakeholder response to preventing youth offending, evaluate and learn to inform our approach to place-based work.

At the same time, we are undertaking a review of existing evidence on preventing youth offending, and analysis to identify the cohort of children and young people, and the desired outcomes, that the Youth Endowment Fund will target.

11. What do you mean when you say ‘fund and evaluate?’

The existing UK evidence-base on what we can do to prevent youth offending is limited. Over the ten years of the fund, we aim to develop our knowledge of what works by independently evaluating the impact of all the interventions that we fund.

The ten year life span of the fund will allow us to work with promising interventions over the long term. We will fund and support them to move along the evidence spectrum through increasingly robust evaluations.

More information about evidence standards can be found in the Early Intervention Guidebook and in 10 steps for evaluation success.

12. What is the Youth Endowment Fund Evaluation Panel?

The funding offered by the Youth Endowment Fund will test the effectiveness of interventions intended to reduce offending and antisocial behaviour, with the aim that those that are shown to work are scaled to reach more young people. All activity which the Youth Endowment Fund supports will be independently evaluated. The Evaluation Panel is our roster of approved evaluators.

13. How can I apply for the Youth Endowment Fund Evaluation Panel?

Our current round of recruitment to the panel is now closed. However if you are interested in applying to become a Youth Endowment Fund independent evaluator in future, you can register your details with youthendowmentfund@impetus.org.uk and we'll let you know when we are opening the panel up to applicants again.

14. What is the minimum threshold of eligibility for funding?

Applicants will need to have a plausible ‘theory of change’ i.e. an understanding of why their intervention is needed; who it is for; what it aims to achieve; how the intervention will achieve the intended outcomes for young people at risk of later offending; and how all this is supported by the available research.

For those interventions with a strong theory of change but limited impact data we will work with an independent evaluator to design an evaluation that will look at how well the intervention is delivered, and to understand the views and experiences of the young people, delivery staff and other involved stakeholders. In some cases, we will look to collect outcomes data for the young people to see how they have progressed whilst on the programme.

15. How will organisations ‘move along the evidence spectrum?’

Evaluation findings will help us and the grantee to understand the potential of the intervention to improve youth offending outcomes, and those with promising results will receive further funding and support from the Youth Endowment Fund to undertake a more robust evaluation, such a randomised control trial (RCT) or quasi-experimental design, which can better tell us the true impact of the intervention on outcomes for young people.

Organisations with interventions that have already demonstrated evidence of their impact on application will be considered for these types of evaluation from the start.

Organisations with interventions that show impact on youth offending in these kinds of more robust evaluations will receive support from the Youth Endowment Fund to scale their interventions so more children at risk of being drawn into crime and violence can benefit.

We will share the learnings from all the evaluations to build the evidence base so everyone working to tackle this issue can use the findings.

16. Will the Youth Endowment Fund be running any briefing events for potential applicants?

We want to make the application process as straightforward as possible. We ran three regional briefings in June 2019 (in Cardiff, London and Manchester). If you weren't able to attend one of these, you can watch our webinar instead.

We’ve developed detailed guidance notes and our grants team will be available by phone and email to offer assistance. We’ll be posting these questions and answers on our grants website over the eight weeks that the grant round is open.

17. What if I just need funding to develop or run my existing programme and/or I do not want it to be evaluated?

Funding from the Youth Endowment Fund is not intended to replace existing funding for delivery of interventions or to fund the development of programmes. It will fund and evaluate promising programmes to expand so that we can learn if they are having an impact. We will publish the findings and use them to inform our understanding of what works in reducing youth offending.

18.What support will grantees receive from the Youth Endowment Fund?

The Youth Endowment Fund will adopt a ‘funder plus’ model, offering support to grantees to build the foundations for sustainable, long-term impact.

The level of this support will vary according to the level of evidence underpinning a programme and the needs of the grantee.

The Youth Endowment Fund will draw on the Impetus and Social Investment Business support models to:

  • provide pre-application guidance to strengthen applications
  • advise grantees on programme design and delivery, and how to prepare for evaluation
  • strengthen the organisational capacity and resilience of grantees with interventions with the most potential for impact at scale, by providing expert support in areas including strategy, planning and governance, and impact management.

19. How can I apply for the Youth Endowment Fund?

The Youth Endowment Fund open call round is now closed. Shortlisted applicants will go to our grants committee in September for consideration, with successful applicants receiving funding in October.

Later in the year we’ll be looking to fund a smaller number of interventions with good evidence of impact and which are ready for large scale evaluation. These could be interventions already being delivered in the UK, or which have good evidence from other countries and we can fund them to bring and test that intervention in England and/or Wales.

We are planning two-three theme-based funding rounds per year. These themes could be different types of intervention, or different groups of needs of young people or outcomes that we think are linked to later crime and violence outcomes. These themes will be informed by the ongoing evidence review to ascertain what is known about what works to prevent youth offending, and the most predictive risk and protective factors for young people.

20. Update on our first grant round (July 2019)

Thank you to everyone who came to one of our events, watched our webinar, spoke to us over the phone and submitted an application for this grant round, or registered their interest for future ones. We enjoyed talking to all of you and we were inspired by all the activity happening to support young people at risk of being drawn in to crime and violence. We received 445 applications in total and they came from every region of England and Wales and from a variety of organisations.

Number of applications, by region

(blank)

8

England – East

24

England – East Midlands

37

England – London

126

England – North East

28

England – North West

58

England – South East

43

England – South West

23

England – West Midlands

43

England – Yorkshire & Humber

33

Wales – Mid Wales

2

Wales – North East

2

Wales – South East

15

Wales – South West

4


Percentage of applications, by organisation type

(blank)

8

Charities/Social Enterprises

63.7%

Local Authorities

14.3%

Companies

7.0%

Schools

6.3%

Police

4.5%

Youth Justice

1.8%

Colleges and Universities

1.3%

NHS

0.7%

Fire Service

0.4%

We are now in the process of assessing all the applications which came in to our first grant round. We received a high volume of applications and we have committed to giving all applicants individual feedback, so we’ll be contacting applicants in the first week of September (rather than mid-August as we said when we opened the grant round).

21. What about the place-based work?

In year one we’ll be developing our model for place-based working by undertaking research and talking to stakeholders and experts.

At the same time, we’ll be reviewing data on youth offending to identify areas of high need across England and Wales. In year two we’ll open a funding round for local partnerships from these areas to apply for funding and support to develop their long-term local strategies for preventing and tackling youth offending.

22. Vacancies

There are currently no vacancies at the Youth Endowment Fund. See if there are any vacancies at Impetus.

23. Contact details

The best way to stay up-to-date with developments such as our recruitment, our grant rounds, and our events is to:

We are currently developing our logo, brand and website and in time you’ll be able to sign up to our mailing list. For now, you can email us to be notified about grants.

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